Wanderlust

Bookshelf: What We’re Reading

cloud

Holidays can bring such a recharging of the spirit, especially if one gets to journey to far away places. And while books can illuminate and enrich our experiences, (like Italofile designer Louise Fili who takes us along with her on eight walks through Florence) Fall grounds us, and our reading list becomes crowded with tomes to bring far away lands here. These new releases are a great inspiration, armchair travel to tide us over until we hit the road again. 

A contemporary portrait of Paris from Les Deux Magots to a Bastille Day parade is offered by shutterbug Nicolas Guilbert. Considered the Axel Vervoordt of Asia for his masterful use of ancient elements and materials renowned Thai architect Ong-Ard Satrabhandhu’s residential Lanna architecture is characterized by the concept “discovery, not invention.” Instead of visiting the souk, we might be consoled by some new tea cups while co-authors Andreas von Einsiedel and Julia Leeb take us inside some of Morocco’s most beautiful and stylish homes. And acclaimed Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson brings us 700 historic recipes to feed our soul from Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden.

Expo Milano 2015

Expo Milan

Launched May 1st – with 145 countries participating, 184 days of events, and over 20 million visitors expected – Expo Milano explores the theme “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life.”  The New York Times recently examined the feast of architectural styles at the worlds fair, which, James Biber architect of the American Pavilion described as an “identity parade.” His design, “American Food 2.0: United to Feed the People” includes a vertical farm – a 7,200 square-foot crop wall growing 42 varieties of vegetables, grains and herbs – and a boardwalk from repurposed Coney Island wood.

If Milan isn’t in your travel plans, you can still take a virtual tour, and follow their feed on Instagram.

Cineteca Nacional

mex

Mexico City has a beautifully updated National Film Archive and Film Institute thanks to the work of Rojkind Arquitectos. The institution’s renovation incorporates intricate new structures like an angular aluminum canopy perforated with triangles, an outdoor amphitheater, and a two-story zone for shops that have transformed the well-trodden campus (a frequently used cut-through to a nearby metro station) into a popular social and cultural hub for the community. The building’s renewal continued internally with the addition of four extra screening rooms, two archive vaults, and a museum dedicated to the history of Latin America cinema. What was once a ‘temporary facility’ that partially burned down in 1982, is now a welcoming complex that is used by thousands of people a day as a pathway, lunch spot, and event space.

Image by Marysol*

Museums After Dark

robots

The “After Hours” program is the first recipient of the IK Prize, an initiative that facilitates the enjoyment of art through the use of digital technology. The prize winners Tommaso Lanza, Ross Cairns, and David Di Duca, also known as “The Workers,” plan to bring art to night owls with the use of hi-tech robotics. Beginning this summer, anyone with a Wi-Fi connection will be able to sign up to for a late night self-guided through the Tate Britain thanks to camera wielding robots.

Image via Movie Mania

Design Shanghai

Bocci_image

Design Shanghai launches February 27 bringing 150 of the brightest names in architecture and international design to China for a week of showcases featuring contemporary, classic, and limited edition furniture, textiles, lighting, and more. Set in the palatial and newly renovated Shanghai Exhibition Centre, the event will place a strong emphasis on China’s rapid growth and give their growing class of elite consumers the opportunity to purchase high-end global designs from the likes of Tom Dixon, Alessi, and Fritz Hansen. The most sought after and exclusive collectibles will go up for auction March 2.

Image via Design Show Shanghai

Design Indaba Film Festival

cape

Premiering February 21, Design Indaba FilmFest 2014 will present an array of films devoted to creativity in its countless forms. With feature-length films on urban design, street and performance art, photography, architecture, motion graphics and more, it will be sure to delight design fans of all types. Not only is the event’s content unique- the moving-going experience sets itself apart with a selection of films being screened at an old drive-in at Maiden’s Cove, Clifton and the rest projected at South Africa’s oldest surviving building The Castle of Good Hope. Never-before seen in South Africa, the films ruminate on inspiration, human nature, and the urban condition, undoubtedly leaving the viewer with a lasting impression.

Watson travels to Africa

flag

IBM is bringing super computer Watson to Africa to assist researchers in tackling pressing needs in the healthcare, sanitation, education, human mobility, and infrastructure sectors. “Project Lucy,” named after our earliest known human descendant, is IBM’s ten-year and 100 million dollar initiative that gives scientists the time and resources to utilize Watson’s computing abilities to help solve Africa’s most crucial challenges. The compilation and analysis of big data will assist experts in comprehending the obstacles that contribute to Africa’s stagnate economy and pervasive poverty. Food prices, GDP, and the size of diseased populations are just a few of the categories the project will seek to better understand through data compilation and the identification of emerging patterns.

Image via Freestock.ca

Light Play

UVA

Following in the footsteps of Random International’s wildly popular Rain Room installation that debuted at London’s Barbican before moving on to the Museum of Modern Art, United Visual Artists (UVA) debuts their own immersive exhibit Momentum at the London art centre this month. The spatial experience consists of “12 pendulums that activate light and sound as they swing” patterning the curved walls and encircling the visitor in fluid light and a rhythmic soundscape. Conceptualized and executed in just six months and described as “a blissfully meditative experience,” the installation is certainly not to be missed if in London between now and June 1.

Image by James Medcraft via It’s Nice That

Panama’s Bold Biomuseo

bio

World-famous architect Frank Gehry is set to debut his first built work in Latin America. After a number of delays, the Biomuseo in Panama City, a bold and colorful 43,000-square-foot concrete structure with an elaborate folded roof system is now receiving a limited number of visitors in five of its eight interactive galleries. Built on a former U.S. Army base at the entry of the Panama canal, the museum was conceived to highlight the country’s biodiversity and rich ecosystem. The project has dual intentions – to introduce tourists to Panama’s natural charms and serve as a catalyst for environmental conservancy among locals.

Image via Skyscraperlife

Herbert Bayer’s Werbegrafik

bayer

The Bauhaus Archive Berlin’s current exhibit Mein Reklame-Fegefeuer. Herbert Bayer. Werbegrafik 1928-1938 offers a view of the iconic graphic designer’s commercial work during the tumultuous years of transition from the Weimar Republic to the Third Reich. Bayer is best known for the geometric sans-serif typeface he designed in 1925 for the Bauhaus school’s communications. After leaving the Bauhaus Dessau in 1928, Bayer moved to Berlin and applied his radical principles of modern graphic art in designs for hundreds of posters, book covers, advertisements, and brochures for both the private and public sector. The show illustrates Bayer’s controversial post-Bauhaus output with 200 works that are on display until February 24.

Image via Cea.

Twitter View all

Wert&Co. has been retained by a leading foundation in CA seeking a VP of Innovation to create system level impact +… https://t.co/o3T4VGTMLM

WordPress SEO fine-tune by Meta SEO Pack from Poradnik Webmastera