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Wait List Only! Hope to see you next week across the pond! Judy will be having a conversation with @andybudd about… https://t.co/XtaLwcgGYL

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We invite you to enjoy our archive of delightful posts.

Bookshelf: What We’re Reading

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The fourth volume in the Palette series Palette 04: Neon delves into the the brightest color that exists — neon. The color has made a remarkable comeback of late and is surfacing everywhere from fashion to furniture. For those engaged in green design, The Environmental Design Pocketbook, is filled with diagrams, tools, and tips to guide architects, planners, and engineers on how to meet sustainable standards. Representing the roots, foundation, and perspective of 44 unique architects, The Images of Architects offers a privileged look at the images that inspire their creative worlds.

Image via gpoo

X-Space

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108 eighth-grade students at REALM Charter School in Berkeley, CA took charge of their own library and designed X-Space. The activity was part of the school’s Studio H initiative, an in-school curriculum that encourages students to build socially-engaged projects. Yearning for a place to study, relax, and learn, the students conceived X-Space as a warm and welcoming place for  discovering “X.” The library has specially designed X-shaped stackable “STAX” that were made with plywood and CNC technology. To help fund books, construction materials, lighting, fixtures and technology donate to Studio H’s Kickstarter until March 27.

Image via Project H

Milton Glaser: Design Icon

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Renowned graphic design icon Milton Glaser designed the new posters for Mad Men’s final season. The 84-year-old veteran worked in advertising during the 1960s, making him and the fictional Don Draper contemporaries. This season’s poster is a whirl of colorful shapes and curling lines, a hybrid of late 60s flower power and Art Nouveau flora. The poster’s blurry lines hints at the show’s constant play between fiction and reality, but in typical Mad Men style reveals nothing concrete.

Image via 50 Watts

Mechanical Mirrors

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Artist Daniel Rozin creates fascinating interactive installations using sensors and motors that re-adjust a series of objects to reflect whatever is standing in front of them. The mirrors are different shapes, sizes, and colors assembled with a variety of materials including wooden pegs, plastic spokes, and pieces of trash to create unique patterns: one resembles a lovely basket weave, another made of wood cylinders appears reflective like an amalgam of shiny pennies. The secret to the mechanics is the hidden camera behind each composition that feeds what it sees in real-time to a computer, which translates the image into a video signal. Rozin’s custom designed software then instructs each motor to move the panel it controls accordingly, resulting in a mirror-image of the subject. This summer art lovers will have a chance to interact with the installations in person as part of the Digital Revolution exhibition at London’s Barbican.

California Living

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Beginning March 29, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts will present California Design, 1930-1965: Living in a Modern Way. More than 250 mid-century design artifacts, including furniture, textiles, fashion, and vehicles will immerse the viewer in the airy California style that Charles and Ray Eames, Richard Neutra, and RM Schindler made iconic. The progressive designs are contextualized with information that reflects on the period’s social, cultural, and creative consciousness. The goal of these designers, according to the exhibition’s curator Barron Bailly, was “to make everyday life beautiful and comfortable.” The groundbreaking exhibition organized by the LACMA is the first major study of modern California design, and PEM is its only stop on the East Coast. Catch it before it closes July 6.

Image via PEM

Bookshelf: What We’re Reading

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Holly Becker and Leslie Shewring’s new book Decorate with Flowers offers practical advice on how to best select floral arrangements that compliment your home decor. Sharing tricks and fun ways to experiment with flowers, the book is a go-to source for the style-minded home entertainer. Our Time, a lovely thick monograph by Cat Garcia, chronicles creatives going about their daily lives — each image cloaking famed creators like Giles Deacon and Bella Freud in zen-like calm. In Golden Meaning: 55 Graphic Experiments, founders of GraphicDesign& Lucienne Roberts and Rebecca Wright share the responses of 55 creatives who they challenged to a mathematical design problem: Euclid’s golden ratio.

Beautiful Science

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The 21st-century is the golden age of data visualization. This phenomenon is evidenced in everything from film plots to the world’s billionaires being mapped and dissected into glossy, digitally produced pictorial compositions. A new exhibition at the British Library, Beautiful Science, reflects back on how complex information was displayed before the onset of computers. Serving as a time capsule of factual representation, the show features drawings that represent topics from Crimean war deaths to ocean currents with the oldest diagrams dating back to the early 17th-century. Art in themselves, the detailed illustrations of yore shed light on the incredible ways information has been distilled by hand.

Reinterpreting Italian Craft

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Fabrica, the illustrious Italian communications research center, recently opened Extra-Ordinary gallery, a collection of everyday objects that reinterpret Italian craft traditions. Employing traditional Italian materials like blown glass from Murano and marble from Canova, the minimal but luxurious items are all made by hand domestically. Paying tribute to daily rituals and life’s small pleasures, the collection features paperweights, bowls, vases, and wire baskets that epitomize the beauty of simplicity.

via Fabrica

Cineteca Nacional

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Mexico City has a beautifully updated National Film Archive and Film Institute thanks to the work of Rojkind Arquitectos. The institution’s renovation incorporates intricate new structures like an angular aluminum canopy perforated with triangles, an outdoor amphitheater, and a two-story zone for shops that have transformed the well-trodden campus (a frequently used cut-through to a nearby metro station) into a popular social and cultural hub for the community. The building’s renewal continued internally with the addition of four extra screening rooms, two archive vaults, and a museum dedicated to the history of Latin America cinema. What was once a ‘temporary facility’ that partially burned down in 1982, is now a welcoming complex that is used by thousands of people a day as a pathway, lunch spot, and event space.

Image by Marysol*

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