Pattern recognition

Rose are Red….

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Lilacs, False blue, White, Purple, Color of lilac, Your great puffs of flowers….

As the East Coast begins to thaw, we are counting the days in anticipation of trying the LikeThat Garden app which works like a Shazam for flowers. Available for free, it promises to turn even the most hardened urbanist into a botanist.

(Quote from Poem ‘Lilacs’ by Amy Lowell)

Rainbow Retail

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We’ve been eagerly anticipating the launch of & Other Stories in the US, a brand better known across Europe. Their recent billboard on the streets of New York points to a wider trend in retail design these days – the beautiful colors of the rainbow. Recently spotted by trend firm WSGN at Benetton’s Moscow concept store, the theme repeats thru-out Kvadrat’s new Tokyo showroom in both plexiglass and fabric.

Blogging Break

We invite you to enjoy our archive of delightful posts.

Mechanical Mirrors

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Artist Daniel Rozin creates fascinating interactive installations using sensors and motors that re-adjust a series of objects to reflect whatever is standing in front of them. The mirrors are different shapes, sizes, and colors assembled with a variety of materials including wooden pegs, plastic spokes, and pieces of trash to create unique patterns: one resembles a lovely basket weave, another made of wood cylinders appears reflective like an amalgam of shiny pennies. The secret to the mechanics is the hidden camera behind each composition that feeds what it sees in real-time to a computer, which translates the image into a video signal. Rozin’s custom designed software then instructs each motor to move the panel it controls accordingly, resulting in a mirror-image of the subject. This summer art lovers will have a chance to interact with the installations in person as part of the Digital Revolution exhibition at London’s Barbican.

Beautiful Science

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The 21st-century is the golden age of data visualization. This phenomenon is evidenced in everything from film plots to the world’s billionaires being mapped and dissected into glossy, digitally produced pictorial compositions. A new exhibition at the British Library, Beautiful Science, reflects back on how complex information was displayed before the onset of computers. Serving as a time capsule of factual representation, the show features drawings that represent topics from Crimean war deaths to ocean currents with the oldest diagrams dating back to the early 17th-century. Art in themselves, the detailed illustrations of yore shed light on the incredible ways information has been distilled by hand.

The Art of Cuisine

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This month New York City’s The Drawing Center exhibits sketches by famed chef Ferran Adria formerly of the world renowned restaurant El Bulli. Ferran Adria: Notes on Creativity sheds light on the chef’s creative process offering glimpses into his conceptualization of dishes that often employ molecular gastronomy and other nontraditional food preparations. The Drawing Center’s Executive Director, Brett Littman, witnessed Adria’s creative genius during an eight-hour meal at El Bulli in 2010 and was so captivated by the experience that he reached out to Adria in hopes of exhibiting his work on paper. Adria’s models, diagrams, and sketches take the viewer through the journey of his fanciful dishes, from initial brainstorm to final plating instructions for his artfully arranged cuisine. On view through February 28.

Image via The Drawing Center

Reading Rooms

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Belgian architecture studio BC Architects has designed the first building of a new school for deaf children in Burundi, Africa. The clay colored structure was built by the firm along with community members and features local materials including rammed earth walls and baked ceiling tiles. The design borrows from indigenous building typologies and serves as both a quiet educational space and gathering place for the community. Another take on a library, The Bookmobile Project travels the United States and Canada via a vintage airstream trailer that contains 300 books you can’t get at your local library including one-of-a-kind photocopied zines and small press publications.

Image via Dezeen

Fabricating Nature

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An interesting trend has been emerging in the realm of 3D printing: the desire to create or re-create nature through digital fabrication. London-based artist, Yuri Pattison, was inspired to print meteor-like objects after the Chelyabinsk meteor was spotted in the Russian sky in February 2013. Listings for fragments of the meteor on eBay drove Pattison to contemplate culture’s fetishization of the ‘original’ object and conceive of an art project that used eBay images to assemble a 3D model. The results are hunks of printed steel and silver that serve as a meditation on ‘authentic’ vs. ‘imitation.’ In Slovenia, the University of Maribor is experimenting with 3D technology to grow living vegetation in their project printGREEN. Their ‘garden printer’ is fed a mixture of soil, water, and seed and then manipulated to create a variety of shapes… that grow!

Image via Dazed Digital by Baker & Evans

Bookshelf: Innovation Reading

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Last week, Innovation Excellence released their suggested innovation readings for 2014, ranging from established classics to more recent releases. The book’s subjects focus on everything from “disruptive innovation”, unleashing creativity and the importance of collaboration in innovation. Suggested titles include  Change By Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation by  Tim Brown, The Innovator’s Dilemma by Clayton Christensen, Where Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson, and his TED talk of the same title.

Deconstructed Dutch Portraiture

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In American artist Michael Mapes riveting new work, he painstakingly assembles facsimiles of portraits painted by Dutch masters including Rembrandt and Nicolaes Eliaz Pickenoy. Hundreds of specimens – photos, hair, insect pins, gelatin capsules, glass vials, magnifying glasses, and sequins are meticulously arranged by shape and shade to create images that at a distance possesses uncanny likeness to the 350 year-old originals. The fanciful assemblages are evidence that artistic interpretation knows no bounds. Three of the pieces will be shown at Yellowstone Art Museum’s ‘Face to Face’ exhibit debuting March 2014.

Image via Designboom

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